Good News on the (Trade Show) Marketing Budget: Trends for 2010 – Part 2

What’s ahead for trade shows and other marketing efforts in 2010?

Last week, I referred you to the StrongMail “2010 Marketing Trends” survey which polled more than 1,000 business leaders across a wide range of industries about their marketing plans for the upcoming year. This week I’ll continue reviewing the trends.

Trend: Everybody is jumping on the social media bandwagon. A whopping 59% of surveyed companies will be increasing their social-media budgets. How many will be spending less? A mere 3%.

Social media has become the new essential tool for marketing.

3 things this means to you:

1.  Choose the right social networks. Twitter covers almost every audience. Facebook and Myspace pages work best for products with consumer appeal. LinkedIn groups are most appropriate for BtoB marketing.

2. Stay on message. The speed and flexibility of social media can be a huge advantage, but it can also be a pitfall. Set clear guidelines for all communications, and review the messages and results regularly.

3. Use social media to support trade show exhibits. Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn can allow you to increase the effectiveness of your trade show appearances. You’ll reap great benefits when you integrate social media into your overall marketing strategy.

“Twitter: Best Practices and Tips”
If you’ve felt like tweeting for quite some time now, but didn’t know where to start, this guide is for you.

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5 Ways to Leverage Real-Time Social Media Search for Your Trade Show Marketing

For years Internet search engines ignored Twitter and Facebook. But now Twitter and Facebook are indexed as rapidly as they are updated. This makes social media an even more important tool for you to use for your trade show marketing.

Since page rankings are critical when it comes to being easily found on the Internet, the following five strategies will help you better get, and then keep, the search engines’ fickle attention.

1. Maintain a strong identity.

Your Twittername should be instantly recognizable as your company. Use custom images for your Twitter profile page and your company Facebook page. Instantly recognizable branding matters as much if not more online as in slower-moving media.

2. Use tags and keywords.

Make sure each message includes the name or abbreviation of the trade show you’re particip. Keep an eye on trending topics, and say something about them.

3. Build a following.

On the Internet, connections equal influence. The more others link to your site or retweet your messages, the more powerful you are, and the higher your page rank will grow. So keep using these media between trade shows.

4. Post different content to Facebook and Twitter.

Search engine algorithms downgrade identical messages. Moreover, Facebook gives you more space. Write a brief version for Twitter and a slightly longer one for Facebook.

5. Offer fresh, fascinating content.

You’ll gain followers by giving them something they want or need: information, amusement, a sense of connection and belonging.

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3 Follow-Up Tips for Your 2009 Trade Show Leads


In the end-of-year summations, the one statistic that rankles most is the lead not followed. You developed the lead at a trade show, handed off the information to the Sales department, and they did nothing with it. According to trade show research, as many as 80% of all trade-show leads meet this fate.

With these three tips, you can take control of this statistic and even turn it around. Use these ways to get back in touch with hot prospects.

1. Add them to your social network.
Google and other search engines make it easy to track down leads and discover which networks they use: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, or any of the other social sites. Send them a quick message and a friend request.

2. Send holiday greetings.
Reopen negotiations with a simple non-denominational email or greeting card. Mention where you met, and let the recipient know how to get in touch with you.

3. Offer a holiday gift.
Cases of Scotch are out. According to Chris Brogan, “information is in.” Give them a taste of the services your company can provide. Offer them a free white paper to download and perhaps a discount on the first order. Your generosity might well be repaid.

And don’t forget to track the success of these strategies, so next year sales will take your trade show leads more seriously!

Did you find these tips useful?

If so, please forward the link to someone you think can benefit!

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