“Sinister Six” Body Language Habits: How Many Do Your Tradeshow Staffers Have?

How many of your booth staffers realize that the most important message they send is communicated without a single word being spoken? Body language is a critically important element of communication. The way we hold ourselves, from posture to hand position and our proximity to our peers can determine how successful we’ll be as exhibitors.

Here’s a quick checklist. How many of the following “Sinister Six” body language habits do your staffers have?

1.    Crossed Arms of Doom: Arms rigidly locked over the chest, a clear non-verbal cue that the arms’ owner doesn’t want to do any talking!
2.    Look at my Shoes!  Attention fixed on the carpet makes it easy to avoid meeting attendee’s eyes.
3.    Jiggle, jiggle, jingle: We’re not sure what’s so interesting in your pockets — but we really hope it’s change!  A signal of anxiety, nervousness, and poor stress management — not likely to inspire confidence in a prospect!
4.    I hope this table’s really strong: If you’re so tired that the table has to hold you up, you’re clearly too exhausted to talk to attendees.  Don’t lean on the furniture!
5.    Dance fever: Hopping from foot to foot, shuffling nervously, this little anxiety inspired jig makes us want to give you directions to the restroom — not our business.
6.    The classic fig leaf: It’s okay — you’re wearing pants.  You don’t need to ‘cover yourself’ from prying eyes!

Share

Good News on the (Trade Show) Marketing Budget: Trends for 2010 – Part 2

What’s ahead for trade shows and other marketing efforts in 2010?

Last week, I referred you to the StrongMail “2010 Marketing Trends” survey which polled more than 1,000 business leaders across a wide range of industries about their marketing plans for the upcoming year. This week I’ll continue reviewing the trends.

Trend: Everybody is jumping on the social media bandwagon. A whopping 59% of surveyed companies will be increasing their social-media budgets. How many will be spending less? A mere 3%.

Social media has become the new essential tool for marketing.

3 things this means to you:

1.  Choose the right social networks. Twitter covers almost every audience. Facebook and Myspace pages work best for products with consumer appeal. LinkedIn groups are most appropriate for BtoB marketing.

2. Stay on message. The speed and flexibility of social media can be a huge advantage, but it can also be a pitfall. Set clear guidelines for all communications, and review the messages and results regularly.

3. Use social media to support trade show exhibits. Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn can allow you to increase the effectiveness of your trade show appearances. You’ll reap great benefits when you integrate social media into your overall marketing strategy.

“Twitter: Best Practices and Tips”
If you’ve felt like tweeting for quite some time now, but didn’t know where to start, this guide is for you.

Share

3 Follow-Up Tips for Your 2009 Trade Show Leads


In the end-of-year summations, the one statistic that rankles most is the lead not followed. You developed the lead at a trade show, handed off the information to the Sales department, and they did nothing with it. According to trade show research, as many as 80% of all trade-show leads meet this fate.

With these three tips, you can take control of this statistic and even turn it around. Use these ways to get back in touch with hot prospects.

1. Add them to your social network.
Google and other search engines make it easy to track down leads and discover which networks they use: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, or any of the other social sites. Send them a quick message and a friend request.

2. Send holiday greetings.
Reopen negotiations with a simple non-denominational email or greeting card. Mention where you met, and let the recipient know how to get in touch with you.

3. Offer a holiday gift.
Cases of Scotch are out. According to Chris Brogan, “information is in.” Give them a taste of the services your company can provide. Offer them a free white paper to download and perhaps a discount on the first order. Your generosity might well be repaid.

And don’t forget to track the success of these strategies, so next year sales will take your trade show leads more seriously!

Did you find these tips useful?

If so, please forward the link to someone you think can benefit!

Trade show course button

Share